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Master in Technology and Privacy (ON LINE)

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Key information

Edition: Second
Hours: 1500.00
Language: English
Start date: 20/02/2017
End date: 20/12/2017
Credits: 60.00 ECTS
Number of places: 24
Code: 16OEX0021
Closed enrollment

Price: 2.470,00€
Price:
Timetable: ON LINE
Venue: ON LINE

PRESENTATION

This master’s degree is the result of several conversations held in recent years between practitioners and academics in the field of surveillance studies, all of whom highlighted the lack of available training in order to fill academic or technical positions in the field of privacy and data security.

In the realm of privacy and data protection, the emergence of a European Data Protection framework and the rapid growth of IT-enabled data surveillance and mining mean that privacy management is increasingly professionalised. Chief privacy officers, privacy managers and technologists are now commonplace across the public and private sectors. Privacy policies remain unevenly implemented, and there is a growing need and high demand for analysts and practitioners at the intersection of privacy and technology.

The current development of privacy-related policies (data protection, tapping communications, etc.) means that the privacy management of organisations is becoming increasingly important. The purpose of this master is  to meet the growing need to train professionals devoted to privacy management matters in order to fill the positions created to fulfil the regulations in this field. Specifically, the Master’s Degree in Technology and Privacy aims to  meet the need arising from the proposed new 2015 European Data Protection Directive, which will make it compulsory for all companies with over 250 employees and all public bodies to have a Data Privacy Officer (DPO).

This master is therefore conceived as a qualification that will meet the existing short-term demands and long-term demands, given that demand will increase exponentially in the next few years.

OBJECTIVES

AIMS OF THE MASTER

This course is intended for those aiming to build or enhance their careers in the field of technology consultancy related to privacy matters. The main goals are:

  • To train students to confidently tackle tasks in the field of privacy management and data protection, always linked to technological advances.
  • To transfer the knowledge accumulated through collective work among academics and professionals in the fields of technology, law and policy.
  • To train professionals in the field of privacy capable of designing and evaluating policies intended to protect the private sphere.

The specific aims include:

  • To provide a full understanding of the social, ethical, legal and technological consequences of surveillance with special focus on the technical impact in terms of issues such as trust, proportionality and information access.
  • To foster the skills to design privacy policies in a creative and analytical manner.
  • To teach students how to identify key problems that threaten privacy and the stakeholders involved, and to evaluate the impact of policies.
  • To develop the capacity to understand the basic elements of data protection measures, such as resistance to surveillance or privacy-enhancing tools.
  • To give students a grounding in key concepts for the implementation of non-invasive technologies, such as Privacy by Design (PbD) or Privacy-enhancing technologies (PETs).

The master’s degree also addresses the sociological, political, legal and ethical context in which privacy protection policies and technologies are developed.

 

OBJECTIVES OF EACH MODULE

MODULE 1. PRIVACY AND SURVEILLANCE CONCEPTS (I)

This module offers students an introduction to the basic concepts used in the study of privacy and surveillance, providing a comprehensive theoretical grounding in the subject matter, starting with the historical development of surveillance, including different points of view on the extent of its centralisation and totalisation. In addition, the module discusses data protection and its relation to privacy and surveillance, and offers an introduction to ways in which surveillance has been conducted ‘from below’ (sousveillance) and in the pursuit of accountability (counterveillance).

MODULE 2. PRIVACY AND SURVEILLANCE CONCEPTS (II)

This module focuses on the digital and technological elements of surveillance. Students are introduced to concepts describing surveillance overreach and discrimination, and other concepts such as ‘dataveillance, which describes the ways that information and communication technologies have facilitated new forms of surveillance. Identification, a practice that has been speeded up enormously by ICTs, is addressed in relation to its socio-technical ramifications. Students are also introduced to the economic elements of privacy and surveillance.

MODULE 3. LAW, POLICY, AND TECHNOLOGY

In this module, the master’s programme turns to legal matters. Students are first of all introduced to privacy law and current policies on privacy in the EU and beyond, with particular focus on data protection, leading on to a broader exploration of the role of privacy professionals, together with national and supranational data protection agencies (in anticipation of the later Chief Privacy Officer modules). The module will also address issues related to the recent revelations about government mass surveillance.

MODULE 4. DESIGN OF SECURE SYSTEMS

The demand for privacy increasingly requires know-how in digital technologies. This module provides students with an understanding of the technical elements required for auditing a technological system, ensuring anonymity, data protection and cryptographic operations such as encryption and re-identification. Looking ahead to the next module on impacts, this module includes material on how societal impact must be measured right from the design stage of a technological system.

MODULE 5. MEASURING PRIVACY AND TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS

This module brings together policy, technology and societal values to provide students with an understanding of the tools used for measuring privacy, surveillance and data protection impacts. This involves evaluating policies and their implementation, which often requires significant organisational commitment based on an ethical approach. In addition to explaining the cycles of a policy, this module introduces students to methods of engaging with multiple stakeholders and following responsible research and innovation (RRI) frameworks. The module draws strongly from ongoing EU-funded FP7 projects on which Eticas is collaborating, characterised by an RRI approach that evaluates societal impact during the design of technologies.

MODULE 6. TOOLS AND SECTORS (I) AND (II)

This module provides a sector-based approach to privacy issues, through the lens of law enforcement, health, smart cities and banking, among others. Examining privacy in these contexts, with an empirical focus, the module also discusses “data tools”. These tools are methods through which data is collected and treated, or through which the results are applied. These include biometrics, databases, algorithms and drones. By the end of this module, students will have a strong grasp of the landscape of privacy-invasive and privacy-enhancing tools.

MODULE 7. PRIVACY MANAGER

This module addresses the now well-entrenched professionalization of privacy managers in the public and private sectors. Building on the knowledge acquired in the previous modules, this module gives students a grounding in (1) the policy elements of privacy and data protection such as European and international data protection frameworks and (2) the technical and managerial elements of a role – the Chief Privacy Officer – that is in growing demand. This includes learning how to carry out a privacy impact assessment (PIA), how to engineer principles such as privacy by design (PbD) and how to plan an organisational privacy programme.

MODULE 8. FINAL ASSESSMENT

The master’s programme offers final assessment options that cater to different needs and career options. The programme can be completed through the professional or academic track.

Students who opt for the professional track undertake an internship, while those who opt for the academic track must write a research paper.

 

AIMED AT

This course is aimed at professionals, students or scholars interested in the field of technology consultancy related to privacy issues.

ADMISSION

– Applications from candidates with backgrounds in criminology, law, sociology, computer science, economics, and political science.

– Candidates who have completed the first cycle of a degree can also apply; however approval of the Master’s Coordination Committee is required.

Note: students who do not hold a previous university qualification will be entitled to obtain, under the same conditions, a certificate of attendance issued by the University of Girona Foundation: Innovation and Training.



PROGRAMME

MODULE 1. PRIVACY AND SURVEILLANCE CONCEPTS (I)

– The relationship between privacy, surveillance and data protection

– History and Sociology of surveillance: the Panoptic and beyond

– Surveillance dimensions: (institutional, corporate, interpersonal)

– Social relations and values under surveillance

– Resistance strategies: sousveillance and counterveillance

– Privacy, security and transparency

– Privacy Advocacy

 

MODULE 2. PRIVACY AND SURVEILLANCE CONCEPTS (II)

– Digital identification technologies and Dataveillance

– Identification practices and techno-social relations (STS)

– The economics of privacy

– Technology and surveillance risks (function creep, disclosure, discrimination, etc.)

– The surveillance industry: actors and experts

 

MODULE 3. LAW, POLICY, AND TECHNOLOGY

– The fundamentals of privacy law and policy

– Data protection principles and data subjects’ rights

– Who does what: privacy professionals, managers, and technologists

– DPAs: competences, possibilities, limitations

– Tapping, hacking and controversies (NSA, etc.)

– The transatlantic debate

– Limitations, problems and new technological developments

 

MODULE 4. DESIGN OF SECURE SYSTEMS

– Technological audit: software, hardware and networks

– Threat detection and modelling

– Cryptography, anonymity and re-identification

– Secure storage and authentication management

– Translating societal concerns into technological solutions

 

MODULE 5. MEASURING PRIVACY AND TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS

– PIAs, SIAs, DPIAs, etc.

– The policy cycle: problem definition, design, implementation, evaluation and indicators

– Stakeholders and value transfers: public authorities, private actors, media and civil society

– Responsible research and innovation and ethics

– Research project assessment and case studies

 

MODULE 6. TOOLS AND SECTORS (I) AND (II)

– Introduction to data tools: Metadata, The Cloud, Biometrics, Geo-location, Gamification, Algorithms, Big Data, Internet of Things, Social networks, DBs, Browsing, Drones

– Sectors:

  • Law enforcement
  • Health
  • Science and research
  • Workplace & Corporate
  • Marketing & behavioural advertising
  • Smart cities
  • Crisis management
  • Journalism
  • Banking
  • The entertainment industry

 

MODULE 7. PRIVACY MANAGER

– Duties and responsibilities of privacy managers

– European and international privacy and data protection frameworks

– Privacy policies in the public and private sectors and Public-Private Partnerships (PPP)

– Assessment of privacy risks and management of information requests

– Duties and responsibilities of privacy managers

– European and international privacy and data protection frameworks

– Privacy policies in the public and private sectors and Public-Private Partnerships (PPP)

– Assessment of privacy risks and management of information requests

– Data management and computer security

– Role of chief privacy officers and data protection officers

– Implementing an organizational privacy program and strategy

– Conducting a Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA)

– Engineering: Implementing Privacy by Design (PbD, PETs)

 

MODULE 8. FINAL ASSESSMENT

The master’s programme offers final assessment options that cater to different needs and career options. The programme can be completed through the professional or academic track.

Students who opt for the professional track undertake an internship, while those who opt for the academic track must write a research paper.

The second option, which takes the form of a final research project, involves presenting a proposal beforehand.

In conclusion, through its material and assessment options, the master’s programme enables students to choose various career paths and provides them with a broad-based skillset in the fields of technology, security, and privacy.

TEACHING STAFF
Teaching staff

–Antonella Galetta, PhD researcher, Vrije Universiteit Brussel

–Augusto Délkader, political scientist and public sector consultant

–Claudia Diaz, PhD, Assistant Professor at the COSIC research group of the Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) at the KU Leuven

–Elvira Santiago, postdoctoral researcher

–Francesco Flammini, PhD, IEEE Senior Member and ACM Distinguished Speaker

–Gemma Galdon Clavell, PhD in Public Policy

–Genís Margarit, telecom engineer and IT security consultant

–Gertjan Boulet, PhD candidate in Law at Faculty of Law & Criminology of Vrije Universiteit Brussel

–Gioacchino Mazzurco, computer science engineer

–Gloria Gonzalez Fuster, PhD in Law

–Hervé Falciani, Systems Engineer, whistle-blower and creator of the Falciani list, providing information on 130,000 suspected tax evaders with Swiss bank accounts

–Jacqui Taylor, PhD, web scientist

–Javier Toret, Degree in Psychology, member of the IN3/UOC Networks, Movements & Technopolitics research group

–Jose Manuel Pérez Marzabal, Master of Laws, PhD candidate

–Josian Llorente, cultural manager

–Katarzyna Szymielewicz, lawyer specialised in human rights and technology, co-founder and President of the Panoptykon Foundation

–Lisa Lucile Owens, PhD candidate and Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia University, New York

–Mario Viola, PhD in Law

–Xosé Quiroga, Bachelor of Laws, journalist

*The management team  reserves all rights to make changes If any teacher can’t teach a subject, always ensuring the same quality and professional category levels.


Management

– Gemma Galdon Clavell. PhD in Public Policy.



Coordination

–Alejandro Vélez, political scientist, PhD in Humanities



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